my friend rabbit

My Friend Rabbit

Title: My Friend Rabbit

Author: Eric Rohmann

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: Rabbit tries to be a good friend, but bad luck just seems to follow him. He is persistent in trying to make things right.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Reading body language
  • Early prediction
  • Early inferencing
  • Animal vocabulary
  • Spatial terms
  • Early narrative
  • Friendship

Why I like this book: The pictures are awesome. It’s an adorable story filled with friendship and humor that kids love.

Ideas for use:

  • A great story for the Story Grammar Marker “Braidy” through www.mindwingconcepts.com. Simple characters, clear “kickoff,” plan, and an easy sequence to follow.
  • Have kids make guesses as to how characters are feeling and based on their body language. Frustrated, annoyed, sad, etc. The illustrations are great for emotions.
  • A great story for cut out “thinking bubbles”- what are the characters thinking, why?
  • This is a great story to model spatial concepts such as “on top,” “under,” “above,” “below,” etc. Use stuffed animals similar to the story to have kids follow directions incorporating these terms.
  • Have children predict what might happen next. There are lots of “clues” as to what rabbit’s plan is, as well as what eventually happens in the end.
  • Have the children add to the ending. What might the rabbit and mouse do next to get out of their new problem?
  • I use “tub” toys (sponge animals that stick to the wall with a spray bottle of water) to “act out” this story. I have the kids follow directions, placing animals “on top” of each other like the story. I model and teach other similar spatial terms (i.e. above, under, etc.).
  • A good story for a younger social group. It opens discussion for how we can be good friends, even when friends make mistakes. Why is rabbit a good friend? Why is mouse a good friend?

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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duck rabbit pic

Duck! Rabbit!

Title: Duck! Rabbit!

Author: Amy Krouse Rosenthan and Tom Lichtenheld
Age: preschool, early elementary
Description: A story of perspective. Is it a duck? Is a rabbit? It all depends on how you look at it!

Goals/Concepts:

  • Perspective Taking
  • Flexibility
  • Social Language Skills

Why I like this book: It’s a great model for perspective taking, fun illustrations, and kids love it. It always gets kids talking, and in social groups with each other (which is often the goal)!

Ideas for use:

  • It’s a great model when teaching kids about flexibility, and that everyone has different ideas.
  • A great compliment to Michelle Garcia Winner’s Unthinkable Program© (Social Thinking© ) when introducing “Rock Brain” (a character who is inflexible).
  • Draw an abstract shape (anything will do, oval, cloud shape, square, etc.) and make copies. Give to kids and have them turn the shape into something. See how many different ideas there are, and how there are no right answers. We all have different ideas in our head.
  • Great book to discuss tone of voice with early elementary kids and older. The dialogue in this story is great for modeling how we say things. Have students try the dialogue and try different tones of voice. Sarcastic, angry, friendly/joking….and different situations when that would be expected/unexpected (language from Social Thinking©).

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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sensory

The Sensory Team Handbook

Title:  The Sensory Team Handbook: A hands-on tool to help young people make sense of their senses and take charge of their sensory processing

Author:  Nancy Mucklow

Age:  pre-teens and teens

Description:  An instructional resource book for pre-teens and teens with sensory processing disorder

Goals/Concepts:

  • Explains the brain-body connection
  • Teaches about the 7 senses including muscle sense and gravity sense
  • Describes impact of SPD on social and emotional well-being
  • Teaches strategies for managing sensory needs
  • Workbook pages are included throughout the book to provide opportunity for reflection and personalization

Why I like this book:  The concepts are presented in teen-friendly language with cartoony illustrations and humor along the way.

Ideas for use:

  • Helpful for children who are newly diagnosed with SPD in later elementary years.  Also good for kids who were diagnosed early but are ready to go a little deeper into issues and solutions
  • Great teaching tool for parent and child together to promote understanding and communication
  • Share with teachers and therapists
  • Use in a book group format for small groups of kids or in parent-child book group

Submitted by:  Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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why-does-izzy-cover-her-ears-dealing-with-jennifer-veenendall-hardcover-cover-art

Why Does Izzy Cover Her Ears?

Title: Why Does Izzy Cover Her Ears? Dealing with Sensory Overload

Author: Jennifer Veenendall

Age: early elementary

Description: A young girl enters first grade only to discover the sensory demands of the classroom lead her to cry, hide, lash out at others, and become socially alienated. Understanding adults in her life help Izzy manage the chaos so she is able to enjoy school, learn, and make friends.

Goals/Concepts:
• Sensory processing disorders
• Behavioral outcomes of auditory, tactile, visual, and vestibular modulation challenges
• Social impact of sensory modulation disorders
• Positive effects of sensory diet strategies for school and home

Why I like this book: There are few books that accurately depict sensory processing disorders in tangible ways for young children. This one succeeds and the illustrations are great.

Ideas for use:
• Read to children with SPD to help them understand they are not alone and not “bad.”
• I have adapted this book for use with preschoolers as young as 3 ½. They see themselves in the story and love it!
• The illustrations beautifully demonstrate through facial expression and body language the functional and social consequences of sensory modulation disorders.
• It is wonderful to see kids light up when they come to the pages on strategies for managing sensory processing issues in school.
• Read to a class to increase their awareness and understanding of children with sensory processing disorders.
• Share the book with teachers, therapists, and parents to help broaden their understanding of sensory modulation disorders.
• Read to siblings of children with SPD.

Submitted by: Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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i-just-forgot-image

I Just Forgot

Title: I Just Forgot

Author: Mercer Meyer

Age: preschool, early elementary

Description: Little Critter tries to remember what he’s supposed to do…but sometimes, he just forgets.

Goals/Concepts:
• “F “ initial words
• Reading body language
• Early narrative
• Sentence structure, conjunctions “but”
• Early “why” questions (Why is mommy frustrated/mad?)

Why I like this book: Little Critter is easy for kids to relate to, and adorable.

Ideas for use:
• Have speech production kiddos repeat and label “f” initial words (i.e. forgot, feed, feel, ect.)
• Have kids interpret body language. How is mommy feeling? Why? Have kids act it out.
• Why does your mommy feel mad/frustrated? When is she happy?
• Have kids retell the story. Have them include “first, next, then, last.”
• Model “but”- Little critter put his dishes in the sink BUT…he forgot to put the milk away. (see if they can fill in the “but” clause) See if they can use “but.” Have them make up their own stories. I.e.” I remembered to get dressed, BUT I forgot to brush my teeth…” Have them add their own illustrations.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Pirates Don't pic

Pirates Don’t Change Diapers

Book: Pirates Don’t Change Diapers

Author: Melinda Long

Age: Early Elementary

Description: While Jeremy’s mom is running an errand, his old pirate friends come for a visit and are forced to help Jeremy take care of his baby sister.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Narrative Language and Retelling
  • Reading Body Language
  • Figurative Language
  • Prediction

Why I like this book: The illustrations are amazing. Kids love the humorous story. Who doesn’t love silly pirates?

Ideas for use:

  • Great narrative structure for the discussing and teaching the Story Grammar Marker elements(clear characters, setting, initiating event, events, resolution, etc.)
  • Use with “Braidy” (www.mindwingconcepts.com) to help students retell the story. A good example of multiple “kickoffs” (1)pirates show up, 2)can’t find the map) See the Mindwings concepts website for more information on this amazing narrative tool.
  • Examples of multiple meaning words/figurative language (rock, babysitter). See if kids can come up with other similar words (i.e. duck, carpool, etc.) Have them draw “both” meanings.
  • Discuss the amazing body language in this story (i.e. boy holding stinking diaper). Draw thinking bubbles- what are they thinking? Why? How can you tell?
  • Have kids act out the body language and the story. Could use a pretend play boat and people, or have the kids act themselves.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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llama

Is Your Mama a Llama?

Title: Is Your Mama a Llama?

Author: Deborah Guarino

Age: preschool, early elementary

Description: A young llama asks many of his animal friends if their mothers are llamas.

Goals/Concepts:
• /l/ words (llama, Lloyd, Lynn, seal, etc.)
• Phonological awareness (rhyming)
• Early narrative
• Early prediction
• Animal vocabulary

Why I like this book: The repetitive nature allows for kiddos to help you read, rhyme, and make “guesses” as to who the baby animal’s mother is. The illustrations are awesome too.

Ideas for use:
• Have your /l/ articulation kiddo “read” the book asking each character, “Is your mama a LLAMA?” (sentence level articulation practice)
• Have your students fill in the rhyming word as you’re reading. If they’re struggling with the word, give them the initial sound. (i.e. You don’t need to go on, I think your mama sounds more like a sssww…..(they fill in swan if possible).
• Retell. Have the children recall the different animals that Lloyd runs into. Encourage temporal markers such as “first, next, then, last…”
• Review the animals in the story. Discuss the similarities and differences among the animals (i.e. swan vs. seal, bat vs. kangaroo, etc.)

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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duck stuck image

One Duck Stuck

Title: One Duck Stuck: A Mucky Ducky Counting Book

Author: Phyllis Root

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: A duck gets stuck in the muck and gets help from many animal friends.

Goals/Concepts:
• Early story retelling.
• /k/ final position
• s-blends (mainly /st/, /sn/)
• early counting
• early animal vocabulary (snails, snakes, fish, moose, etc.)
• Phonological Awareness

Why I like this book: The repetitive nature, and adorable illustrations.

Ideas for use:
• Retelling- A very linear, simple sequence. Have kiddos tell the story using their own words. Help them along by showing the pictures.
• Have them write their own version with all new animals. Pick a category of animals that help. Maybe only farm animals come to help this time! Try jungle animals, ocean animals, bugs, etc. A great way to work on vocabulary development.
• Practice for /k/ in word final positions, at word and sentence levels. The repetitive nature of the story allows for lots of practice (“No luck, duck still stuck”).
• Practice for s-blends. Again the repetitive nature of the story allows for lots of practice (“still stuck”).
• Simple Rhyming: Practice generating words that rhyme: luck, stuck, muck, duck are part of the story. What else can they think of! Each animal movement in the story also rhymes (i.e 2 fish spish to the duck, no luck duck still stuck.). A great model for “nonwords” that rhyme.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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the-paper-bag-princess

Paperbag Princess

Title: The Paper Bag Princess

Author: Robert Munsch

Age: Early Elementary

Description: This Story follows a princess whose life gets interrupted by a dragon.

Goals/Concepts:

• Narrative language-retelling

• Perspective taking

• Inferencing/Prediction

• Reading body language

Why I like this book: The ending is priceless. Every little girl and boy should read this book. Children love the illustrations and the way the princess tricks the dragon.

Ideas for use:
• Retelling- Follows the Story Grammar Marker framework well through Mindwingconcepts A clear “kick-off,” sequence of events, and resolution

•Try this from the princess’s point of view vs. the dragon’s, even the prince! Use “thinking bubbles” or even “Braidy” from the SGM listed above.

• There is lots of “trickery” in this story. Help students make guesses as to “why” the princess is acting like she is (i.e. Why is she complimenting the dragon who just burned down her castle and kidnapped the prince?) Have them think of ways that they have “tricked” others.

•The illustrations are amazing, and are great for pointing out various emotions (many of the “universal emotions”- happy, sad, mad, scared, surprised, disgusted). Have students imitate the pictures. Talk about how ALL of their body can show emotions, not just their face.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Sheep in a Jeep

Sheep in a Jeep

Title: Sheep in a Jeep

Author: Nancy Shaw

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: This story follow some silly sheep whose jeep breaks down.

Goals/Concepts:

•Phonological Awareness (rhyming)

•Speech production, “sh”, “j,” s-blends

•Early prediction

•Early narrative- retelling

Grammar (they are)

Why I like this book? The sheep show great body language for kids to interpret, and the story is always a hit given the silly events that take place.

Ideas for use:

•In a small group it’s a great book to act out for collaboration and ideation (i.e. social language group)

•Have kiddos tell the story using their own words.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP, all4mychild

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