red sled

Red Sled

Title: Red Sled

 Author: Lita Judge

Description:  A little girl leaves her sled outside at night, and realizes that she is sharing it with many forest animals!

Goals/ objectives:

  • Early narrative (simple sequence story)
  • Perspective taking
  • Early prediction
  • Emotion/Facial Expression
  • Vocabulary (forest animals: moose, raccoons, opossum, porcupine, etc.)
  • Social Pragmatics
  • Speech Production

Why I like this story: This story was recommended by a good friend (and also People Magazine ;)) and has been a hit with so many children. It’s mainly a wordless book with adorable illustrations.

Ideas for use:

  • Have children be the “teacher” and read it to you. Encourage temporal markers (first, next, then) and expanding on their language. Would be great to incorporate with early learning of story grammar elements (character, settings, initiating event, etc.) and pair with “Braidy” from Mindwingconcepts.
  • A great story to “act out” in a group. Have different children be the various animals and get on the sled (can use an actual sled, a carpet square, blanket, etc.). Great to work on “sharing space.”
  • Use thinking and speaking bubbles and have kids fill them in. What are the animals thinking, saying, etc.
  • Mainly a wordless book, but lots of opportunity for speech production. For example, I have been using for syllable sequencing kiddos, and making up different sounds the animals make (appropriate for their targets) as they travel down the hills (i.e. wooogoooo, gaaaaaadeeeee, moooooowaaaa, etc.). You could do this with straight articulation targets too.
  • The illustrations are great for working on simple prediction. What animal will be next? What will happen next?
  • Have kids write a “sequel.” What would happen the next day? Would they try another winter sport? Would new animals join? Kids can draw their own pictures, could create on a story making app (i.e. Story Patch), use google images, etc.

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Snow_friends_L

Snow Friends

Title:  Snow Friends

Author: M. Christina Butler and Tina Macnaughton

Description: A little bear wakes from his winter nap and has no one to enjoy the snow with. He decides to build a snowman to play with and meets some friends along the way.

Goals/ objectives:

Narrative/Retelling
Early inferencing and predicting
Why questions
animal/winter vocabulary (winter animals: bear, rabbit, otter)
social skills/friendship
body language

Why I like this story: A cute winter story that encourages friendship and thinking about others.
Ideas for use:

Great story for retelling and identifying the story grammar elements (characters, setting, initiating event, etc.). I pair with “Braidy” through Mindwing Concepts. A clear kickoff and plan (bear needs a friend so builds a snowman…)
use to discuss setting (woods, cave). Draw a big winter wood scene and have child add the various winter animals to retell the story.
Good for description as well as the pictures are textured….sparkly, shiny, white, cold snow. etc.
Great for early prediction/inferencing (e.g. What could be under the snow making noise? (rabbit in burrow), what will they use the sticks for?)
Good for modeling and exposing to “why” questions. Why do they need carrots? Why is the rabbit upset? Why is the bear lonely? etc.
Beautiful illustrations for body language and emotions. Have children act out the body language.
Good story to act out in a group or dyad . Use big exercise balls to act as snow balls. One child holds the bottom while the others, “make” the other snow ball. Encourage team work and communication as they roll the balls.
Discuss friendship and thinking of others. Why did the animals make another snowman? (They didn’t want the snowman to be lonely when they left to do other activities). How can they include others?

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham  M.S. CCC-SLP

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mitten mystery

The Missing Mitten Mystery

Title: The Missing Mitten Mystery

Author: Steven Kellogg

Description: Annie loses her 5th mitten of the season.  While trying to find it her imagination goes wild.  It is found in a most unexpected place.

Goals/ objectives:

  • Question-asking
  • Negation
  • Flexible thinking
  • Sequencing/ retelling
  • Body language/ facial expression
  • “wondering” vs “knowing”

Why I like this story: A wonderful winter story about a lost mitten that’s found.  Always a good thing :)

Ideas for use:

  • while reading, talk about making “pictures in your mind”.  Have the kids generate picture memories of places they would look for a lost mitten (e.g.., in the driveway waiting for the bus, in the hallway on the way to class, on the playground at recess, etc).  Encourage kids to include lots of details.  This is a great excercise for practicing Lindamood-Bell Visualizing and Verbalizing concepts.
  • encourage kids to “imagine” what else the mitten might be used for.
  • identify all of the verbs in the story and discuss the different tenses used to tell the story.
  • discuss the concepts of “wondering” vs “knowing”.  Generate lists of things we wonder about before we actually know (e.g., birthday presents, etc) and what has to happen in order to “know”
  • the illustrations in this book are excellent for talking about facial expressions and body language and reasons for them.
  • have kids generate their own story using the same story structure (e.g., losing a hat in the spring or a kite in the summer)

Submitted by Karen S Head M.S. CCC-SLP

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40-p13-Rabbit’sGift (1)

Rabbit’s Gift

Title: Rabbit’s Gift

Author: George Shannon / Laura Dronzek

Description: A rabbit has a bit more food than she needs for the winter. Soon she learns that sharing with others leads to a wonderful surprise. This sweet story is based upon a Chinese Fable.

Goals/ objectives:
• Regular past tense
• sequencing/ Retelling
• early prediction
• why
• sharing and friendship
• /u/ and /o/ vowel sounds

Why I like this story: A cute winter story.

Ideas for use:
• simple story sequence to retell with repetitive phrases. Can make board maker pictures or use google images to find the various animals. (rabbit, donkey, goat, deer) and use to sequence and retell the story. Incorporate temporal markers (first, next, then, etc.)
• use to discuss setting (woods, cave). Draw a big winter wood scene and have child add the various winter animals to retell the story
• identify all of the verbs in the story and use different tenses to tell the story.
• discuss the idea of taking another’s perspective and the difference between “thinking” and “knowing”
• fun story to act out in a group, with focus upon the ways that the different animals move through the snow and facial expressions related to finding the turnip and thinking of who to share it with
• encourage kids to share personal stories of a time that sharing with others led to a similar surprise

Submitted by Karen S Head M.S. CCC-SLP

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crepes

Crepes by Suzette Interactive Book App

 

Title: Crepes by Suzette

Author: Monica Wellington (See another story by Monica reviewed on all4mychild here

Description:  Suzette, the main character of this story, is a Parisian crepe maker and street-cart Vendor, who travels throughout Paris selling her delicious dessert. This app has wonderful interactive components throughout the story that including a labeled map of Paris with Suzette’s travels, videos and photos of real life experiences in Paris complimenting the story, and highlighted vocabulary provided in various languages (English, French, Spanish, Italian, German and Japanese). The story can be read yourself or to you in these language as well.

Goals/ objectives:

  • Narrative language with a focus on “character” and “setting”
  • Pair with Curriculum Concepts of: cities and maps; Paris, France; art/artists/museums
  • Sequencing
  • Play

Why I like this story: This interactive story app is so engaging, with endless possibilities for children. The music and pictures are appealing as well, and make the entire story experience quite enjoyable.

Ideas for use:

  • Narrative Language goals: Suzette travels all around Paris: Parisian streets, street markets, Luxembourg Gardens, the Seine River, Notre-Dame Cathedral, the Louvre Museum, Tuileries Gardens, Place Vendome, Palais-Garnier (opera house), carousels, and the Eiffel Tower. Use these places to work on understanding of “setting” and setting descriptions. Pair with the Mindwing Concepts Program and/or iPad App setting description (see below). The story lends itself well to describe all the senses that could be experienced.
  • IMG_1584
    • Retell the story focusing on the sequence of events. Add in temporal markers: first, then, next, after that, etc. 
  • Curriculum Concepts: The various landmarks described above could be expanded on with the Google Earth app. This would provide an excellent context for more description and understanding of Paris and/or the “city” concept. See Sean Sweeney’s informative post on Google Earth here and here for more info on the advantages and uses of this app.
    • Use Google maps and “street view” as well. Can you use Google Maps to get from one of Suzette’s locations to the next? Can you compare the map provided in the app (see image below) to Google Maps directions?
    • Would be great to pair with concepts of Maps and directions (north, south, east, west left, right, map keys, streets, bridges, etc.)
    • You could create a map and story in another major city. Can they generate new characters, describe new settings, etc.
  • IMG_1585
  • Sequencing Goals: Use pictures of the various locations (screen shots or google images) and sequence the events of the story. Pair with story retelling.
    • Make Crepes! There is a recipe and video of crepes being made in action. Discuss the various steps and order while following the recipe. This can be “real” or through pretend play! They can use the video examples to make their own “how to make” crepes video (use iMovie or the video recoding app on the iPad/phone)
  • IMG_1586        IMG_1587
  • Play Goals: Act out the story. Kids can be Suzette with their very own cart. They can use a cash register, cooking materials and “take orders” from their customers. More than 1 student, have them “be” the various customers that come to Suzette’s cart. Can they negotiate and plan out the play and the events? Pair with the Mindwing Concepts symbols to assist with the planning states and various “characters” and settings.” Can they generate their own ideas for a different day? A different city?
  • Submitted by Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP
  • A promotional code for this app was given to all4mychild, however, the review are my ideas alone.
Red head pic

Red Hat

Title: Red Hat

Author: Lita Judge

Description:  Similar to Lita Judge’s winter story, Red Sled (see review here) a little girl leaves her red hat outside on the clothes line, and many forest animals decide to borrow it for some fun. However, when they return the hat…it isn’t the same.

Goals/ objectives:

  • Early narrative (simple sequence story)
  • Perspective taking
  • Early prediction
  • Emotion/Facial Expression/Body language
  • Vocabulary (forest animals: rabbits, raccoons, bears, porcupine, etc.)
  • Social Pragmatics and Problem Solving
  • Speech Production

Why I like this story: A nice sequel to the Red Sled story, with wonderful illustrations as a mainly “wordless” book.

Ideas for use:

  • Have children be the “teacher” and read it to you. Encourage temporal markers (first, next, then) and expanding on their language. Would be great to incorporate with early learning of story grammar elements (character, settings, initiating event, etc.) and pair with “Braidy” from Mindwingconcepts.
  • A great story to “act out” in a group. Practice the “set up” of the play: assigning roles for the different animals, choosing objects to represent the house, the clothes line, the hat, the forest.
  • Use thinking and speaking bubbles and have kids fill them in. What are the animals and the little girl thinking, saying, etc.
  • A nice story to discuss simple problem solving. What did the girl do when she saw her hat ruined? Could be a nice discussion for staying “calm” when a problem arises, and working together as a team to fix the problem (as she and the animals knit the hat back together).
  • Mainly a wordless book, but lots of opportunity for speech production. For example, I have been using for syllable sequencing kiddos, and making up different sounds the animals make (appropriate for their targets) as they “steal” the hat and play within the forest (i.e. wooogoooo, gaaaaaadeeeee, moooooowaaaa, etc.). You could do this with straight articulation targets too.
  • The illustrations are great for working on simple prediction. What animal will be next? What will happen next?
  • Work on similarities and differenced between the Red Sled and the Red Hat. What is the same? (concept, some animals, same main character, etc.) What’s different (different season, different animals, borrow and use vs. take and destroyed)
  • I myself am not particularly crafty…however it seems a construction paper hat with red yarn and a pom pom could be a nice pairing with this story:) Could incorporate temporal markers throughout the steps, and direction following during the process.

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Book Dont wake up the bear

Don’t Wake up the Bear

Title: Don’t Wake Up the Bear!

 Author: Majorie Dennis Murray

Description: A sleeping bear becomes a warm, comfy place for many animals to keep warm in the cold. But this becomes a problem when a mouse with a cold wakes up the bear.

Goals/ objectives:

  • negation and contractions (“don’t”)
  • sequencing/ Retelling
  • early prediction
  • why
  • animal vocabulary
  • vocal volume

Why I like this story: A cute winter story.

Ideas for use:

  • simple story sequence to retell. Can make board maker pictures or use google images to find the various animals. (hare, badger, fox, squirrel and mouse) and use to sequence and retell the story. Incorporate temporal markers (first, next, then, etc.)
  • use to discuss setting (woods, cave). Draw a big winter wood scene and have child add the various winter animals to retell the story.
  • have kids predict what animal is next? Can they think of another animal that lives in the woods? What might happen if they wake the bear?
  • kids can add to the story with more winter animals and write their own stories
  • Great for simple why questions. Why are they whispering? Why are they sleeping with the bear?
  • lots of repetition of “don’t” if practicing or exposing to negation or contractions
  • could use for voice volume. Lots of examples of whispering (when bears sleeping) vs. yelling (when bear wakes up). Could tie to the The Incredible 5 Point Scale and use for vocal volume.

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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9780670654000

The Snowy Day

Title: The Snowy Day

Author: Ezra Jack Keats

Description: A classic winter tale of a young boy’s adventures in the snow.

Goals/objectives:
• Early 2-word combinations
• Simple sequencing
• Early inferencing
• “s”-blends
• “wh” questions

Why I like this story: This adorable tale lends itself to use with a wide range of ages. I use it with toddlers to promote 2-3 word utterances and with K-1 kids to work on inferencing, Story Grammar and problem solving. Plus, the illustrations are delightful!

Ideas for use:
• Model simple 2-word utterances (boy walk, snow plop, socks off) for kids to retell the story at this simple language level. Support with simple line drawings if needed
• Copy the pages and have kids put them in order (which happens first, smacking the tree or snow falling on Peter’s head?) to address simple sequencing and cause/effect
• Discuss early problem solving (e.g., how to keep the snow from “plopping” on his head, how to keep the snowball from melting)
• For a group, have the group work collaboratively to figure out how to act out the story given the materials available. Great for negotiation and flexibility
• Have kids generate a similar story with a different concept; such as, “A Sunny Day” or “A Windy Day.”

Submitted by: Karen S Head, MS, CCC-SLP

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Dragon

Me and My Dragon Scared of Halloween

Title: Me and My Dragon: Scared of Halloween

Author and Illustrator:  David Biedrzycki

Age:  preschool, early elementary

Description:  A boy tried to help his pet dragon to not be afraid of Halloween.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Perspective taking
  • Body language
  • Early prediction and inferencing
  • Trying new experiences
  • Narrative language
  • Pretend play
  • Trickery
  • Social skills
  • Halloween vocabulary

Why I like this book:  The illustrations are incredible and keep kids engaged. An adorable story with a nice sequence of events for kids to retell and/or act out. There is also an Elvis reference, which I find awesome…I mean why not? :)

Ideas for use:  

  • A great story for labeling emotions and what characters could be thinking. Create a “thinking” bubble and hold over different characters heads to discuss. Point out and act out body language. Pair that with the character facial expression and discuss the context. There are great examples of “trickery” too- the dragon eventually dressed up as a dragon, but adults and kids think it’s a kid dressed as a dragon. A great opportunity for what do people “think” versus what is really happening.

Screenshot 2014-10-07 14.06.42

  • Encourage “detective eyes” to look for “clues” to help kids make inferences and predictions throughout the story. You can use the “remember” + “know” = “guess” framework for inferencing. For example in the first scene help students REMEMBER (see the clues) of the burned cake, small fire, burned clothing, soot on faces, holding fire extinguisher). What do they KNOW about dragons and fire? (they breathe fire, extinguishers are used to put out fires, etc.), helps us GUESS that the dragon accidentally burned down the cake and presents with his fiery breath!
  • Have students act out the story. Someone can be a dragon, the boy in the story and the various other characters (parents, other kids, etc.). Make a visual plan with the sequence to keep kids on task.
  • There are many opportunities for social skill discussions. A concept we work on constantly is “friends don’t make other friends wait.” The dragon has a tough time selecting his candy while trick or treating. The children in line are visibly frustrated. A good opportunity for discussion.
  • Pair with the Zones of Regulation for different emotions are how our body feels. Lots of opportunity for discussion around regulation. The Dragon obviously is “scared” and even “terrified” which can be at different “zones” in this program. Discuss the differences and what tools could help.

Z of R

Screenshot 2014-10-07 14.04.08

  • There are lots of examples of halloween vocabulary including werewolves, zombies, frankenstein, mummies, costumes, etc.
  • There is lots of “subtle” humor throughout the story that can be pointed out if language skills allow for it.

Submitted by:  Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Dragon

Me and My Dragon

Title:  Me and My Dragon

Author and Illustrator:  David Biedrzycki

Age:  preschool, early elementary

Description:  A boy describes all the things he could do with a dragon and how he would take care of this new and unusual pet.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Perspective taking
  • Body language
  • Early prediction
  • Trying new experiences
  • Managing the unexpected
  • Pretend play
  • Trickery

Why I like this book:  Incredible illustrations practically come alive!  Characters on each page, including the dragon, show a wide range of emotions such as happiness, confusion, fear, remorse, concern, curiosity, sneakiness, and surprise.

Ideas for use:  

  • Before reading the book, discuss what kind of unusual pets kids would like and what they would do with them
  • Read the book to tap into the children’s imagination, then talk again about unusual pets and see if they can come up with different suggestions
  • Before turning the page, ask the kids to predict what will happen next
  • Discuss how each child, adult, or dragon is feeling by noting facial expressions and body language.  Have the kids act out different characters while the others guess which character they are mimicking
  • Help preschoolers with regulation and deep breathing by taking deep breaths and blowing when they see the dragon breathe fire
  • Have kids practice impulse control by holding bubble blowers and only blowing when they see the dragon breathe fire
  • Play open-ended dragon games.  Have the kids make up new ways to play with or take care of a pet dragon
  • Create a dragon with craft materials as a group project

Submitted by:  Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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