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red sled

Red Sled

Title: Red Sled

 Author: Lita Judge

Description:  A little girl leaves her sled outside at night, and realizes that she is sharing it with many forest animals!

Goals/ objectives:

  • Early narrative (simple sequence story)
  • Perspective taking
  • Early prediction
  • Emotion/Facial Expression
  • Vocabulary (forest animals: moose, raccoons, opossum, porcupine, etc.)
  • Social Pragmatics
  • Speech Production

Why I like this story: This story was recommended by a good friend (and also People Magazine ;)) and has been a hit with so many children. It’s mainly a wordless book with adorable illustrations.

Ideas for use:

  • Have children be the “teacher” and read it to you. Encourage temporal markers (first, next, then) and expanding on their language. Would be great to incorporate with early learning of story grammar elements (character, settings, initiating event, etc.) and pair with “Braidy” from Mindwingconcepts.
  • A great story to “act out” in a group. Have different children be the various animals and get on the sled (can use an actual sled, a carpet square, blanket, etc.). Great to work on “sharing space.”
  • Use thinking and speaking bubbles and have kids fill them in. What are the animals thinking, saying, etc.
  • Mainly a wordless book, but lots of opportunity for speech production. For example, I have been using for syllable sequencing kiddos, and making up different sounds the animals make (appropriate for their targets) as they travel down the hills (i.e. wooogoooo, gaaaaaadeeeee, moooooowaaaa, etc.). You could do this with straight articulation targets too.
  • The illustrations are great for working on simple prediction. What animal will be next? What will happen next?
  • Have kids write a “sequel.” What would happen the next day? Would they try another winter sport? Would new animals join? Kids can draw their own pictures, could create on a story making app (i.e. Story Patch), use google images, etc.

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Snow_friends_L

Snow Friends

Title:  Snow Friends

Author: M. Christina Butler and Tina Macnaughton

Description: A little bear wakes from his winter nap and has no one to enjoy the snow with. He decides to build a snowman to play with and meets some friends along the way.

Goals/ objectives:

Narrative/Retelling
Early inferencing and predicting
Why questions
animal/winter vocabulary (winter animals: bear, rabbit, otter)
social skills/friendship
body language

Why I like this story: A cute winter story that encourages friendship and thinking about others.
Ideas for use:

Great story for retelling and identifying the story grammar elements (characters, setting, initiating event, etc.). I pair with “Braidy” through Mindwing Concepts. A clear kickoff and plan (bear needs a friend so builds a snowman…)
use to discuss setting (woods, cave). Draw a big winter wood scene and have child add the various winter animals to retell the story.
Good for description as well as the pictures are textured….sparkly, shiny, white, cold snow. etc.
Great for early prediction/inferencing (e.g. What could be under the snow making noise? (rabbit in burrow), what will they use the sticks for?)
Good for modeling and exposing to “why” questions. Why do they need carrots? Why is the rabbit upset? Why is the bear lonely? etc.
Beautiful illustrations for body language and emotions. Have children act out the body language.
Good story to act out in a group or dyad . Use big exercise balls to act as snow balls. One child holds the bottom while the others, “make” the other snow ball. Encourage team work and communication as they roll the balls.
Discuss friendship and thinking of others. Why did the animals make another snowman? (They didn’t want the snowman to be lonely when they left to do other activities). How can they include others?

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham  M.S. CCC-SLP

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Elmer

Elmer

Title: Elmer

Author: David McKee

Description: Elmer the elephant isn’t like all the other elephants. He’s colorful and struggles with that difference. After trying to be like all the other elephants and failing, he realizes how much his friends appreciate his uniqueness.

Goals:

  • Friendship
  • Social Skills
  • Narrative language/Retelling
  • Animal Vocabulary

Why I like this book: A good example of appreciating people’s differences, and teaching children to be themselves.

Ideas for this book:

  • Have each child come up with something they can do (i.e. sometimes do friends ideas even if it isn’t exactly what they want, ask a friend what their favorite game is and play it together, let another friend go first, etc.), or something that they are good at, that makes their friends think/feel positively towards them. Discuss how Elmer was good at making the other elephants laugh and enjoy themselves. This made his friends like him, and want to spend time with him. Could they use one of their “talents” or traits to enjoy their time with friends? Maybe they are great at legos- they could make a lego tower together with a friend? Maybe they are good at drawing- they could draw a picture for their friend of their friend’s favorite thing. Encourage discussion around what others are thinking about and feeling when they do these things. They could even draw pictures of this, and share. Use thinking and speaking bubbles to demonstrate how what friends would be thinking and saying.
  • If in a group- have kids each come up with something positive about another group member. What is something that they like about that friend? What makes them special? Again, pair with thinking and speaking bubbles.
  • A great story to identify story grammar elements (i.e. characters, setting, initiating event, etc.). I like to pair with MindwingConcepts story grammar marker /”Braidy” to help students identify and retell the story.
  • Have children retell using “Braidy” or using the pictures from the story. Encourage temporal markers and cohesive ties during their retell.
  • Elmer walks through the jungle and sees various jungle animals. Have children describe and generate other jungle animals. Great to pair with the Expanding Expression Tool (EET) for added description. Could also work on comparing and contrasting of various animals.
  • At the end of the story, the elephants each color themselves in honor of Elmer one day a year. Provide students with an elephant, and have them decorate their own. How would they design themselves? If in a group- a great activity to see how everyone would color themselves differently. Discuss how we all are different, and have different ideas in our head. A great discussion for how much more interesting life is because of our differences. This is illustrated well in this story.

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Hush-A-Thai-Lullabye

Hush!

Title: Hush! A Thai Lullaby

Author: Minfong Ho

Description: A Caldecott Honor winning story of a mother desperately trying to keep the animals of the jungle quiet as her baby is sleeping. However, little does she know that her baby is awake the whole time.

Goals:

  • Inferencing
  • Reading body language
  • Phonological awareness (rhyming)
  • “Who?” questions
  • Retelling (early narrative)
  • Animal vocabulary
  • Perspective Taking
  • /l/ blends, /l/

Why I like this book: This is one of my favorite stories. The pictures are adorable, and the poetic story keeps kids engaged. Kids also love the animal noises that author provides (i.e. HOOM-pra, HOOM- Pra for the elephant,  Op, Op for the frog, etc.)

Ideas for use:

  • Great book to teach early inferencing and prediction. There are visual clues as to what animal could be making noise next. Have kids collect the “clues” from the mothers words or from the pictures
  • the body language is amazing in this story. Lots of examples for children to interpret, act out, and infer what she is thinking and feeling. Add cut out thinking bubbles above the mother’s head.
  • have kids fill in the blank to generate the rhyming word while reading
  • the story is a good model for “who” questions (a person or animal) as the mother is consistently wondering “who” is making the given noise.
  • a simple sequencing narrative for kids to retell. Use the pictures and have the kids retell the story. Encourage temporal markers
  • would be a good simple narrative to pair with “Braidy” from Mindwingconcepts
  • good story to discuss “setting” as the story takes place in a hut in the jungle of Thailand . Have kids generate and discuss the animals of the jungle, the plants, what they would see and hear (pair with the Visualizing and Verbalizing approach for description)
  • Carry over to pretend play: If a group- Have kids “act” it out! One “mommy” can tell the animals to “hush!” The repetative phrases are easy for kids to remember.
  • If you don’t have a group, use pretend play toys and act out. A simple pretend play house would work- what could be making noise in the house that the mommy would worry about? (i.e. mail man, the dog, cars outside, etc.) Work on sequencing of play schemes.
  • The mother never knows the baby is AWAKE. Perfect to discuss and model perspective taking. Use thinking bubbles and act out for comprehension
  • Lots of /l/ blends and repetitive for kids to practice (sleeping, black, etc.)

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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do you

Do You Want To Be My Friend?

Title: Do You Want To Be My Friend?

Author:  Eric Carle

Description: A lonely mouse is looking for a friend to play with. He has to ask a lot of animals before he finds the right one.

Goals/objectives:

  • Early Inferencing/Predicting
  • Possession
  • /s/ production (final word position)
  • Animal Vocabulary
  • Why Questions and Reasoning
  • Sequencing
  • Early Narrative/ Retelling
  • Friendship or Social Skills

Why I like this book: It’s a simple, mainly wordless book that kids love and can be adapted for a number of speech, language or social goals across ages.

Ideas for use:

  • Have children predict what animal is coming next. The tail of each animal is shown before the actual animal. Have them make guesses.
  • Great for possession. The Elephant‘s tail, the Seal’s tail, etc. Good for part/whole relationships as well.
  • Great for /s/ targets. Can adapt to word, sentence levels. Mouse, mice, all final position possession (snake’s, peacock’s, etc.)
  • Why questions and reasoning. WHY isn’t the horse a good fit for the mouse? (grumpy or too big) WHY isn’t the elephant a good fit for the mouse? (too big, would be hard to play with, etc.). WHY isn’t the snake a good fit? (he would eat the mouse!) Because it’s wordless, have kids predict what the animal is likely say to the mouse. Can add in tone of voice discussion as well.
  • Print pictures of the animals, or use toy animals and have children sequence the story. Add in temporal markers such as first, next, then, etc.
  • Have children “act” out the story. If in a group, many animals to re-enact. If not in a group, provide a toy mouse or have the child be the toy mouse and ask other “animals” to play in the accurate order.
  • For a social group- good for discussion around joining others play. It doesn’t always work out. Good to discuss this concept and what makes a good friend. The mouse doesn’t give up, and eventually finds a “good match” for a friend.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Picture 6

Little Blue Jackal

Title:  Little Blue Jackal

Author:  Niyaa educational apps

Description: A simple book in the form of an app. An Indian folk tale about a Jackal who gets into some trouble, and learns a valuable lesson.

Goals/objectives:

  • Why Questions
  • Perspective taking
  • Narrative/Retelling
  • Auditory Comprehension
  • Reading Body language

Why I like this book: Cute story with some interactive properties that keeps engagement, but not too many that take away from the story or experience itself.

Ideas for use:

  • Lots of inferential based and explicitly stated “why” questions to ask students (e.g. Why is the jackal running away? Why do the animals think the blue Jackal should be the king?
  • For home programming- have parents read the story (or have the story read to the student- both are options) and answer the provided comprehension questions under “parent-child activity.”
  • Tie to science/animal/jungle curriculum- There is a page of “7 hidden facts about animals.” Rich with vocabulary (e.g. migrate, pride, stag, etc.).
  • Use “thinking bubbles” (actually make, use a white board). The Jackal has unintentionally tricked the other jungle animals. A great example of “trickery” and with one animal thinking one thing, and the other animals thinking something different. The story even has 2 bird characters throughout the story that give their own ideas/perspective. Would be great to model (the birds talk) or have them think about the story from the birds’ perspective.
  • A good story to pair with Mindwingconcepts for students to retell. A story with multiple initiating events.
  • Have students read body language of the characters. Imitate, have them attempt! Why are they feeling that way? How can you tell?
  • The author provides a “moral” at the end of the fable. For older students see if they can come up with a “moral” of the story. The author suggests “how we look does not change who we really are,” however, there are a number of other lessons that can be learned from this story (i.e. the negative effect of lying).
  • Have older students generate their own fable based on a moral
  • Find this app on iTunes

Disclaimer: all4mychild was provided with a promotional code for this app

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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goodnight

Good Night Gorilla

Book: Good Night, Gorilla

Author: Peggy Rahmann

Age: preschool, early elementary

Description: A sneaky gorilla steals the zookeepers keys, and lets out all of the zoo animals. They follow him home, all without him ever realizing.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Syllable sequencing (velar-alveolar sequence)
  • Animal vocabulary (zoo animals)
  • Perspective taking
  • Early Narrative
  • Reading Body Language
  • Early Prediction

Why I like this book: It’s one of my favorites because it can be used for so many goals. It’s consistently a hit with my younger friends, but also a great almost “wordless book”for my friends who are working on their narrative skills.

Ideas for use:

  • For kids working on sound sequencing (i.e. apraxia or underlying motor planning difficulties) they can practice saying “good night” (2 syllable velar-alveolar sequence) or “good night X” (3 syllable sequence) as the zoo keeper says goodnight to each of the animals on the story. Pair with touch cues. Great repetitive practice.
  • For other speech production kiddos maybe with “fronting”- good practice of /g/ (but challenging with the co-articulation….so consider that…)
  • Great book for perspective taking. Does the zookeeper “know” that the gorilla is out? Why not? Act out to help with understanding. There are lots of opportunities to discuss what characters are “thinking” and “feeling” (i.e. Gorilla is thinking “wahoo! I’m out…who else can I play with?”). Pair with cut out “thinking bubbles.” Copy pages and write in actual thinking bubbles
  • Lots of great body language to interpret and act out
  • A great book for early prediction. Who might the Gorilla let out next? (i.e. Is a cow a good guess? How about a tiger? Why is a tiger a better guess?, etc.)
  • A great story to retell. Have kiddos use their own words to tell you what is happening. Encourage temporal markers, and appropriate sentence structures.
  • For younger re-tellers- use pictures supports of the animals and sequence the order. Practice first, next, then, after that, etc.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Waking up images

Waking Up is Hard to Do

Title:   Waking Up Is Hard to Do

Author:   Music and Lyrics by Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, Children’s Lyrics by Neil Sedaka, Illustrated by Daniel Miyares
Age:   Preschool, Early Elementary
Description:   A young alligator goes through his morning routine getting up and ready for school.  His engine is running low at first light but slowly improves as he participates in all the sensory and motor activities involved in a typical morning.  A CD is included that adds to the delightful lyrics and illustrations.
Goals/Concepts:
  • Sequencing
  • Routines
  • Activities of daily living
  • Arousal levels from low to high
  • Sensory input inherent in all morning activities (vision-morning light, auditory-alarm clock, movement-stretching, oral/tactile-brushing teeth, oral-breakfast, muscle sense-books and back pack)
  • Family
  • Social/friendship
  • Early narrative
  • Early prediction
  • Animal Vocabulary (jungle, zoo animals)

Why I like this book:  Catchy tune, fun lyrics, and bright, beautiful illustrations make this book hard to put down… even for an adult.  There is so much to see on each page.

Ideas for use:

  • Many families describe mornings as very challenging.  Try reading this book to them in the evening in preparation for the following day.
  • Play the CD first thing in the morning and look at illustrations together to start the day.
  • Use the book and story to illustrate some activities that can help increase a low arousal state…to get the body engine running.
  • While looking at the book, have kids identify parts of each step in the routine that might help them get their own engines going in the morning.
  • Act out the story NOT in the morning to emphasize the steps and sequence of the routine.
  • Use the pictures to have the child retell the story. Encourage words like “first, next, after that, last, etc.”
  • A great book for description as the illustrations are gorgeous. Play “I spy” on each page
  • Lots of opportunity for “why” and prediction (i.e. why is he feeling blue? Why is the turtle missing the bus? After brushing teeth, what will he do next?, etc.)

Submitted by:  Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L and Meghan Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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my friend rabbit

My Friend Rabbit

Title: My Friend Rabbit

Author: Eric Rohmann

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: Rabbit tries to be a good friend, but bad luck just seems to follow him. He is persistent in trying to make things right.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Reading body language
  • Early prediction
  • Early inferencing
  • Animal vocabulary
  • Spatial terms
  • Early narrative
  • Friendship

Why I like this book: The pictures are awesome. It’s an adorable story filled with friendship and humor that kids love.

Ideas for use:

  • A great story for the Story Grammar Marker “Braidy” through www.mindwingconcepts.com. Simple characters, clear “kickoff,” plan, and an easy sequence to follow.
  • Have kids make guesses as to how characters are feeling and based on their body language. Frustrated, annoyed, sad, etc. The illustrations are great for emotions.
  • A great story for cut out “thinking bubbles”- what are the characters thinking, why?
  • This is a great story to model spatial concepts such as “on top,” “under,” “above,” “below,” etc. Use stuffed animals similar to the story to have kids follow directions incorporating these terms.
  • Have children predict what might happen next. There are lots of “clues” as to what rabbit’s plan is, as well as what eventually happens in the end.
  • Have the children add to the ending. What might the rabbit and mouse do next to get out of their new problem?
  • I use “tub” toys (sponge animals that stick to the wall with a spray bottle of water) to “act out” this story. I have the kids follow directions, placing animals “on top” of each other like the story. I model and teach other similar spatial terms (i.e. above, under, etc.).
  • A good story for a younger social group. It opens discussion for how we can be good friends, even when friends make mistakes. Why is rabbit a good friend? Why is mouse a good friend?

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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llama

Is Your Mama a Llama?

Title: Is Your Mama a Llama?

Author: Deborah Guarino

Age: preschool, early elementary

Description: A young llama asks many of his animal friends if their mothers are llamas.

Goals/Concepts:
• /l/ words (llama, Lloyd, Lynn, seal, etc.)
• Phonological awareness (rhyming)
• Early narrative
• Early prediction
• Animal vocabulary

Why I like this book: The repetitive nature allows for kiddos to help you read, rhyme, and make “guesses” as to who the baby animal’s mother is. The illustrations are awesome too.

Ideas for use:
• Have your /l/ articulation kiddo “read” the book asking each character, “Is your mama a LLAMA?” (sentence level articulation practice)
• Have your students fill in the rhyming word as you’re reading. If they’re struggling with the word, give them the initial sound. (i.e. You don’t need to go on, I think your mama sounds more like a sssww…..(they fill in swan if possible).
• Retell. Have the children recall the different animals that Lloyd runs into. Encourage temporal markers such as “first, next, then, last…”
• Review the animals in the story. Discuss the similarities and differences among the animals (i.e. swan vs. seal, bat vs. kangaroo, etc.)

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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