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Rosies Walk Cover

Rosie’s Walk

Title: Rosie’s Walk

Author: Pat Hutchins

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: Rosie the hen goes for a walk around the farm. Little does she know that there is a fox following her.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Early narrative
  • Simple sequencing
  • Farm vocabulary
  • Basic concepts/prepositions (around, over, under, etc.)
  • Early perspective taking
  • Early prediction (Will the fox get Rosie? What do you think will happen?)

Why I like this book: The story is simple, and kids love it. Great pictures, and simple humorous ending.

Ideas for use:

  • Great introducing of “setting” (the farm) from the Story Grammar Marker. Discuss other settings, and describe them (what do we see here, hear, feel, etc.)
  • Use “Braidy” (www.mindwingconcepts.com) for a simple sequence story to have kids retell.
  • Use the pictures in the story, and have kids be “the teacher.” Encourage temporal markers: first, next, then, last.
  • Practice prepositions. Have kids “act” out what Rosie does. Have a toy hen (or have them be Rosie!) and have them walk around, through, under, over. Use props.
  • Act out the story. Have a dyad…one child is Rosie, and one can be the fox. Help them make a plan and act it out. If 3 children, have one be the “narrator.”
  • Discuss why Rosie doesn’t know that the fox is behind her. How do we know? Point out body language, where her eyes are, how the fox is likely moving and sounding, etc. Why doesn’t he want her to know…

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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mr bounce

Mr. Bounce

Title:   Mr. Bounce (Mr. Men and Little Miss)

Author:  Roger Hargreaves

Age:  preschool, elementary school

Description:  One of the “Mr. Books” that outright speaks to those overly active, well-meaning, but tough-to-manage kids.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Self-regulation
  • Body awareness
  • Motor planning
  • Perspective taking
  • Good intentions
  • Understanding consequences of actions
  • Accepting help from an adult

Why I like this book:  First of all, this is a series that I used when I was teaching in the late 70’s, and it is adorable.   Even though it’s “old”, kids respond to the characters and story.  There are few books that specifically address those bouncy kids and, as an OT, I am happy to use this one.

Ideas for use:  

  • Before reading, discuss times when you moved too quickly or moved without looking which caused a problem for you or others.  For example, knocking over a coffee cup or tripping over a pair of shoes.  Have the kids offer suggestions of times their high activity level caused bad things to happen.  This helps “normalize” the situation without pointing a negative finger at the “Bouncers.”
  • As you read the story, have the kids anticipate what will happen.  There are lots of opportunities for visualization.  For example, “… you can guess what happened next, can’t you?” and “As you can imagine, that made things very difficult.”  Taking time to think about and discuss these concepts helps kids with ideation and planning.
  • Discuss feelings as you read.  How did Mr. Bounce feel about falling in the water?  The simple line drawings actually have very expressive faces.  Have the kids work on mimicking the expressions.
  • Young kids may not know they need help from adults to manage their high activity level.  They may be disciplined for accidents they cause and feel that they need to figure it out on their own.  I love that Mr. Bounce seeks help from an adult in this book.  Talk with kids about how we, as adults, are here to help them, not punish them.
  • Play a variation of the Silly-Calm body game from the Social Adventures App after reading this book to help kids recognize they can have control over their bodies.  When you say, “Bounce” kids can move, dance, or bounce around the room.  When you say, “Red Boots” (the shoes that were given to Mr. Bounce to help him be more grounded) the kids will freeze their bodies or pretend to sleep, or go back to their seats and remain still.

Check out their great website for lots of fun stuff http://www.mrmen.com

Submitted by:  Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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red sled

Red Sled

Title: Red Sled

 Author: Lita Judge

Description:  A little girl leaves her sled outside at night, and realizes that she is sharing it with many forest animals!

Goals/ objectives:

  • Early narrative (simple sequence story)
  • Perspective taking
  • Early prediction
  • Emotion/Facial Expression
  • Vocabulary (forest animals: moose, raccoons, opossum, porcupine, etc.)
  • Social Pragmatics
  • Speech Production

Why I like this story: This story was recommended by a good friend (and also People Magazine ;)) and has been a hit with so many children. It’s mainly a wordless book with adorable illustrations.

Ideas for use:

  • Have children be the “teacher” and read it to you. Encourage temporal markers (first, next, then) and expanding on their language. Would be great to incorporate with early learning of story grammar elements (character, settings, initiating event, etc.) and pair with “Braidy” from Mindwingconcepts.
  • A great story to “act out” in a group. Have different children be the various animals and get on the sled (can use an actual sled, a carpet square, blanket, etc.). Great to work on “sharing space.”
  • Use thinking and speaking bubbles and have kids fill them in. What are the animals thinking, saying, etc.
  • Mainly a wordless book, but lots of opportunity for speech production. For example, I have been using for syllable sequencing kiddos, and making up different sounds the animals make (appropriate for their targets) as they travel down the hills (i.e. wooogoooo, gaaaaaadeeeee, moooooowaaaa, etc.). You could do this with straight articulation targets too.
  • The illustrations are great for working on simple prediction. What animal will be next? What will happen next?
  • Have kids write a “sequel.” What would happen the next day? Would they try another winter sport? Would new animals join? Kids can draw their own pictures, could create on a story making app (i.e. Story Patch), use google images, etc.

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Snow_friends_L

Snow Friends

Title:  Snow Friends

Author: M. Christina Butler and Tina Macnaughton

Description: A little bear wakes from his winter nap and has no one to enjoy the snow with. He decides to build a snowman to play with and meets some friends along the way.

Goals/ objectives:

Narrative/Retelling
Early inferencing and predicting
Why questions
animal/winter vocabulary (winter animals: bear, rabbit, otter)
social skills/friendship
body language

Why I like this story: A cute winter story that encourages friendship and thinking about others.
Ideas for use:

Great story for retelling and identifying the story grammar elements (characters, setting, initiating event, etc.). I pair with “Braidy” through Mindwing Concepts. A clear kickoff and plan (bear needs a friend so builds a snowman…)
use to discuss setting (woods, cave). Draw a big winter wood scene and have child add the various winter animals to retell the story.
Good for description as well as the pictures are textured….sparkly, shiny, white, cold snow. etc.
Great for early prediction/inferencing (e.g. What could be under the snow making noise? (rabbit in burrow), what will they use the sticks for?)
Good for modeling and exposing to “why” questions. Why do they need carrots? Why is the rabbit upset? Why is the bear lonely? etc.
Beautiful illustrations for body language and emotions. Have children act out the body language.
Good story to act out in a group or dyad . Use big exercise balls to act as snow balls. One child holds the bottom while the others, “make” the other snow ball. Encourage team work and communication as they roll the balls.
Discuss friendship and thinking of others. Why did the animals make another snowman? (They didn’t want the snowman to be lonely when they left to do other activities). How can they include others?

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham  M.S. CCC-SLP

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Book Dont wake up the bear

Don’t Wake up the Bear

Title: Don’t Wake Up the Bear!

 Author: Majorie Dennis Murray

Description: A sleeping bear becomes a warm, comfy place for many animals to keep warm in the cold. But this becomes a problem when a mouse with a cold wakes up the bear.

Goals/ objectives:

  • negation and contractions (“don’t”)
  • sequencing/ Retelling
  • early prediction
  • why
  • animal vocabulary
  • vocal volume

Why I like this story: A cute winter story.

Ideas for use:

  • simple story sequence to retell. Can make board maker pictures or use google images to find the various animals. (hare, badger, fox, squirrel and mouse) and use to sequence and retell the story. Incorporate temporal markers (first, next, then, etc.)
  • use to discuss setting (woods, cave). Draw a big winter wood scene and have child add the various winter animals to retell the story.
  • have kids predict what animal is next? Can they think of another animal that lives in the woods? What might happen if they wake the bear?
  • kids can add to the story with more winter animals and write their own stories
  • Great for simple why questions. Why are they whispering? Why are they sleeping with the bear?
  • lots of repetition of “don’t” if practicing or exposing to negation or contractions
  • could use for voice volume. Lots of examples of whispering (when bears sleeping) vs. yelling (when bear wakes up). Could tie to the The Incredible 5 Point Scale and use for vocal volume.

Submitted by Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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arnosky turkey

I’m a Turkey

Title: I’m A Turkey!

Author: Jim Arnosky

Description:  The life of a turkey from his own perspective.

Goals/concepts:

-phonological awareness skills (rhyming)

-why questions (i.e. ups and downs of being a turkey, why must they be careful, etc.)

-Discussion around body language (i.e. discuss how they communicate “without words”)

-perspective taking

Why I like this book: It’s a fun holiday story.

Ideas for use:

-Have children fill in the rhyming words, or generate other words that would rhyme.

-After reading do a game of charades. The story talks about how in a “group” they often “communicate without words”- expand on this. Could act out thanksgiving theme ideas as well (e.g. turkey, dinner, setting table, cooking, etc.)

-Have children make their own thanksgiving poems.

-for older students, discuss the turkey’s perspective vs. the hunter, vs. the farmer, etc.

-For causals have children fill in “why” turkeys have to be careful…because….

Submitted by: Meghan G.Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Elmer

Elmer

Title: Elmer

Author: David McKee

Description: Elmer the elephant isn’t like all the other elephants. He’s colorful and struggles with that difference. After trying to be like all the other elephants and failing, he realizes how much his friends appreciate his uniqueness.

Goals:

  • Friendship
  • Social Skills
  • Narrative language/Retelling
  • Animal Vocabulary

Why I like this book: A good example of appreciating people’s differences, and teaching children to be themselves.

Ideas for this book:

  • Have each child come up with something they can do (i.e. sometimes do friends ideas even if it isn’t exactly what they want, ask a friend what their favorite game is and play it together, let another friend go first, etc.), or something that they are good at, that makes their friends think/feel positively towards them. Discuss how Elmer was good at making the other elephants laugh and enjoy themselves. This made his friends like him, and want to spend time with him. Could they use one of their “talents” or traits to enjoy their time with friends? Maybe they are great at legos- they could make a lego tower together with a friend? Maybe they are good at drawing- they could draw a picture for their friend of their friend’s favorite thing. Encourage discussion around what others are thinking about and feeling when they do these things. They could even draw pictures of this, and share. Use thinking and speaking bubbles to demonstrate how what friends would be thinking and saying.
  • If in a group- have kids each come up with something positive about another group member. What is something that they like about that friend? What makes them special? Again, pair with thinking and speaking bubbles.
  • A great story to identify story grammar elements (i.e. characters, setting, initiating event, etc.). I like to pair with MindwingConcepts story grammar marker /”Braidy” to help students identify and retell the story.
  • Have children retell using “Braidy” or using the pictures from the story. Encourage temporal markers and cohesive ties during their retell.
  • Elmer walks through the jungle and sees various jungle animals. Have children describe and generate other jungle animals. Great to pair with the Expanding Expression Tool (EET) for added description. Could also work on comparing and contrasting of various animals.
  • At the end of the story, the elephants each color themselves in honor of Elmer one day a year. Provide students with an elephant, and have them decorate their own. How would they design themselves? If in a group- a great activity to see how everyone would color themselves differently. Discuss how we all are different, and have different ideas in our head. A great discussion for how much more interesting life is because of our differences. This is illustrated well in this story.

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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woolly

Can I Bring Woolly to the Library, Ms. Reeder?

Title:  Can I Bring Woolly to the Library, Ms. Reeder?

Author: Lois Grambling

Description: A little boy fantasizes about bringing a Woolly Mammoth named “Woolly” to the library. He provides many reasons why Wooly should be allowed, and predicts what would and could happen.

 

Goals:

  • “Why” questions
  • Inferencing/prediction
  • Curriculum connections: extinct animals
  • Reading Body Language

Why I like this book: The illustrations are wonderful for kids and grownups alike. An entertaining story that can address many higher level language goals.

Ideas for this book:

  • The boy provides many predictions as to what might happen if Wooly comes to the library. Have students generate their own ideas. What could happen if a big animal comes to the library? How could he help? What problems might there be?
  • Lots of opportunity for both implicit and explicit “why” questions. For example,  Why does Woolly need slippers? (because he would make too much noise walking around the library; Why would Wooly be helpful at putting books away? (because he can reach the tall shelves), etc.
  • A great story to connect with expository text/media  around extinct animals. Here is a great example from Brainpop Jr
  • The illustrations are vivid and clear. Great examples of body language for children to interpret. How are characters feeling? Why? How can you tell? To assist with understanding pair with thinking and speaking bubbles
  • The story ends with the boy realizing that Wooly may be homesick if he came to live with the boy. Have students discuss/write about a time when they were homesick? How did they feel and why?
  • At the very end the boy suggests bringing another extinct animal (Saber Tooth Tiger) to the library. Have students create their own version of this story. Use a story generation app/software like the Story Patch App. Have then predict what could happen if that animal were to come to the library? Or to School?

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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mother goose

My Very First Mother Goose

Title: My Very First Mother Goose

Editor: Iona Opie

Illustrator: Rosemary Wells

Age: preschool, elementary school

Description: Dozens of Mother Goose rhymes presented in familiar verse with exceptionally charming watercolor illustrations that appear to move across the page.

Goals/Concepts:
• Rhyming and rhythm
• Phonological awareness
• Reading readiness
• Vocabulary
• Body language
• Attention to detail
• Reinforce friendship and family

Why I like this book: As my youngest child prepares to turn 18, I find myself reflecting on her childhood often. When she was 18 months old, Ali had a very high fever and croup. If her fever wouldn’t come down, I would need to bring her to the emergency room, again. Ali refused to swallow Tylenol with her hacking cough and I refused to bring her to the hospital. So, she sat on my lap in the rocking chair while I began singing each rhyme in this book. Ali did not let me stop until every single rhyme had been sung and by the end of the book, she was relaxed enough to take the Tylenol. We never made that trip to the hospital and that’s why I love this book!

Ideas for use:
• A classic book to read anytime. It’s great when you have a little time available between activities. If kids memorize a few rhymes, they can say/sing them with the adult during transitions while they practice visualizing the illustration.
• Discuss what the characters are doing in the pictures and what might happen next if the rhyme or story were to continue.
• Act out the rhymes after negotiating parts and creating costumes. Have kids use objects in the room representationally. (e.g. What can we use for a boat? Car? Big clock?)
• Create puppet shows with socks, paper bags or other materials. Have kids work in small groups and put on their “shows” for each other.
• Discuss the range of facial expressions and overall body language. Make copies of expressive characters from the book and put them on 3×5 cards. Have kids take turns choosing a card and acting out the character’s expression and movement without talking while others follow the clues to guess, like charades.
• Talk about what characters could be thinking (early theory of mind).

• There are numerous craft activities accessible on line as follow up activities

Submitted by: Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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country mouse

Country Mouse and City Mouse

Title: Country Mouse and City Mouse

Author: Based on an Aesop’s Fable. App by McGraw-Hill

Illustrator: Joyce Hesselberth

Age: preschool, elementary school

Description: A mouse that lives in the city visits a mouse friend who lives in the country.  Although they both enjoy the visits, they long for their familiar homes.

Goals/Concepts:
• Perspective taking
• Trying new experiences
• Flexibility
• Managing the unexpected
• Being kind even if you don’t like someone else’s ideas or things

Why I like this book: I have always liked this story and recently discovered that it is also available as a sweetly illustrated e-book which did not disappoint! I remember reading this book or hearing it read to me when I was very young and was intrigued by how different the city and country environments were from one another. I enjoyed seeing the various activities each mouse shared with the other. I love this book today for the same reasons!

Ideas for use:
• Great story to read before a play date. Talk with your child about the fact that their friend has had different experiences and may have different ideas about play.
• Play a game called “If You Like” with a group of children after reading the story. For example, “If you like snow, jump to the wall”. Discuss and affirm differences as well as similarities.
• This is a great story to act out. Split the group into Country and City mice and have them use materials around the room as props and sets. Have them invite the other group over to visit. The visiting mice will need to follow the lead of the “home” mice and then switch.
• Acting out the story provides a wealth of opportunity to experience movement, deep muscle input and tactile sensations. Rolling down a hill, sliding over ice, and climbing up a tree are a few of the actions that can be mimicked.
• The e-book presents different sounds for the country and the city. Discuss and explore sensory input that can be experienced through the senses in each setting. For example, traffic noises can be heard in the city and birds chirping in the country. You might find bakery smells in the city and smell flowers in the country.
• Split the kids into 2 groups and have each group create sets for either the Country or the City. Then have the kids write a script and make sock puppets for a puppet show.

• Lots of downloadable worksheets and more ideas for use are available on line. Here are just a few:

Scholastic Printables

Lesson Pathways

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Submitted by: Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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