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pumpkin

Spookley the Square Pumpkin

Title: The Legend of Spoookley the Square Pumpkin (ebook/app)

Author: Oceanhouse Media

Description: A rhyming story about pumpkin who is “different” than the rest. Although this is difficult, Spookley’s difference becomes very helpful to the other pumpkins in the patch, and they learn an important lesson.

Goals:

  • Phonological Awareness (rhyming)
  • Vocabulary (Halloween)
  • Social Skills
  • Narrative

Why I like this book: Because it’s an app ($1.99 iPhone/ipad) it has lots of capabilities. It can be read by children (and allows for recording of their voice), or read to students (there is a narrator, or you can choose to read it to them). There are some interactive components as well, but not so many that it takes away from the story itself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ideas for this book:

  • The entire book is in rhyme. Have children fill in the “blank” at the ends of phrases. Provide the initial phoneme, can they predict the rhyming word? (i.e…his friends, where they had curves, he had eeen______(ends)). Use google images, board maker, etc. to make visuals of these rhyming pairs for additional practice, rhyme generation of the pattern (i.e. rare, square, fair, etc.), or home programming. Pair with Rhyming apps such as What Rhymes? or Pocket Phonics App for additional practice
  • This is a great book to expose kids to Halloween vocabulary: pumpkins, patch, scarecrow, bats,  Pair with any of these great apps recommended by The Speech Guy here
  • Use to identify Story Grammar Elements (i.e characters, setting, initiating event, etc.). Great to pair with the Story Grammar Marker by Mindwingconcepts for students to retell the story
  • Great for discussion about “teasing” and “being different.” Have students discuss how Spookley embraced his “difference” – and how it helped save the day.
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Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

Dr Suess

What Was I Scared of?

Title: What Was I Scared Of?: A Glow-in-the Dark Encounter (Classic Seuss)

Author:  Dr. Seuss

Description:  A classic Dr. Seuss book that can now be purchased as an e-book – helpful in these last days of October if you need more Halloween books and have run out of time!  It includes Read to me, read it myself, and auto play options.

Goals: 

  • Perspective-taking.  (Why was the character afraid?   Who is really afraid?)
  • Reading facial expressions and body language.  (How do you know he’s afraid?)
  • Understanding white lies.  (Why does he say, I’m not afraid, when he is?)
  • Vocabulary (Halloween)
  • Phonological Awareness (rhyming)
  • Absurdity and humor
  • Inferencing
  • Feelings
  • Friendship and compassion

Why I like this book:  This is a typical Dr. Seuss story that speaks about real feelings and relationships in the most inventive and silly manner!  The unexpected ending supports new friendships.  Music can play throughout story even in the read it myself mode.

Ideas for this book: 

  • Discuss perspective and intent as you read the book exploring why the main character would be afraid of a pair of pants.   Note that the fear builds with each experience.  How does the character manage his fear?
  • Language describing physiological responses to fear and stress such as “shiver” and “heart thumping” provide opportunities to talk about how our bodies react to fear and anxiety and how we can work to control it through deep breathing, yoga, and other forms of relaxation.
  • The character lies about not being afraid when he clearly was.  This is a good way to talk about why and how some lies are OK.  This character felt calmer when he told himself he wasn’t afraid.
  • Lots of absurdities in this book are fun to talk about – What’s real and not real; what makes a particular scene comical.
  • Great book to talk about making inferences.  You could stop the book and have kids illustrate or act out how they think the book will end.
  • As an OT, I like to have kids act out books.  It provides opportunities for sequencing, ideation, collaboration, planning, adapting, and it’s fun!

Submitted by:  Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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Haunted Party

Haunted Party

Title:  Haunted Party

Author: Iza Trapani

Description: A rhyming story about a Halloween party with lots of spooky guests. They get a surprise when 10 children show up to “trick or treat.”

Goals:

  • Phonological Awareness (rhyming)
  • Vocabulary (Halloween)
  • Verbs (present and past)
  • Inferencing

Why I like this book: The pictures are awesome, which elicits lots of language from students. There are goblins with pointy, dirty ears,  who eat worms and eyeballs. Perfect for kids to comment on and laugh.

Ideas for this book:

  • The entire book is in rhyme. Have children fill in the “blank” at the ends of phrases. Provide the initial phoneme, can they predict the rhyming word? (i.e.what a night, the bats take flllllll______(flight)). Use google images, board maker, etc. to make visuals of these rhyming pairs for additional practice, rhyme generation of the pattern (i.e. flight, sight, might, etc.), or home programming. Pair with Rhyming apps such as What Rhymes? or Pocket Phonics App for additional practice
  • This is a great book to expose kids to Halloween vocabulary: skeletons, goblins, vampires, ghosts, witches, bats , monsters, ghouls and more. Pair with any of these great apps recommended by The Speech Guy here
  • The characters partake in many different activities- great for children working on present progressive verbs (i.e. carving pumpkins, eating worms, bobbing for apples, etc.) or have students retell and focus on the past tense. The great detailed pictures are great to elicit
  • If students are going to Halloween parties and need support as to what to expect- a great story to model activities they may experience. Pair with a social story app like  Stories2learnPictello, or Story Patch
  • There is one clear inference at the end of the story that children can make using picture clues and knowledge. Can pair with the Mindwingconcepts approach to inferencing “remember, know and guess” to help students put the pieces together.
  • Charlesbridge Publishers (local to Boston;) provides a “plan your own Halloween party” worksheet here
Like this post, consider our Social Adventures App available on iOS or as a web app, visit all4mychild.com for more information

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

Please support books4all and order this book from Amazon.com.  Thank you!

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The little Green witch

The Little Green Witch

Title:  The Little Green Witch

Author: Barbara Barbieri McGrath

Description: A play on the “Little Red Hen,” this story highlights a little green witch who does ALL the “unhousework” as her friends the ghost, the bat and the gremlin do little. They learn their lesson at the end of the story…

Goals:

  • Narrative
  • Sequencing
  • Vocabulary (fall, halloween)
  • Emotions (why are they feeling that way?)
  • Inferencing
  • Past Tense
  • /s/ blends

Why I like this book: It’s a “play” on the classic “The Little Red Hen,” which is another favorite of mine. I love the lesson of the story, and the humor is loved by all children.

Ideas for this book:

  • Have students retell the story identifying story grammar elements. I use with “Braidy” from  Mindwingconcepts, is there is a clear “kickoff,” and sequence of events
  • Great for sequencing as well. Have children retell the story using pictures from the story, incorporating “first, next, then, etc.” You photo copy pages of the story- and have students place in order, and take home to retell to their families
  • The story offers lots of fall, halloween vocabulary (pumpkins, witches, gremlins, bats, ghosts, etc.). Tie with Sara Smith’s Expanding Expression Tool and have children expand on the concepts. You can also use our Bag Game App and use the new fall and halloween pictures for description.
  • There are various emotions/states and emotional vocabulary used in the story (frustrated, lazy, disgusted, excited,  annoyed, etc.). Identify with students, and see if they can generate “why” characters feel that way. Can they “act” out the emotion? Can they identify a time in their life when they have felt that way?
  • The story offers opportunity for students to infer what might happen next. If she plants pumpkin seeds what will she need to do next? (water) After that? (pick) etc. The witch’s friends also NEVER help her. See if children can predict what they will do/say next? Can they see the pattern? Can the predict how the witch will feel?
  • Here is a free coloring page to go with the story provided by Charles Bridge Publishers: Coloring Page. Have students color, add descriptive words (use EET from above), generate their own story about a witch, etc.
  • Lots of examples of the past tense. The witch lists what she has done often (I carved. I planted. I watered. I cooked, etc.) Stress the “ed” ending, and encourage students to retell the witch’s actions.
  • There are numerous examples of /s/ blends throughout the story (scare, scooped, stirred, etc.) Encourage students to repeat your utterances, generate their own sentences using the stimuli, etc. Create picture cards that go along with the story to use for additional practice or home programming.

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Little Old Lady Who Wasn't afraid of anything

The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

Title: The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

Author: Linda Williams

Description: A walk in the woods turns into an unexpected surprise for the Little old lady. She meets some visitors along the way who follow her home to try to scare her.

Goals/concepts:

-sequencing

-narrative /Retelling

-Halloween vocabulary (jack’o lantern, scarecrow)

-clothing vocabulary (shirt, pants, shoes, gloves, hat)

-articulation (l blends, sh, s blends )

Why I like this book: It’s a fun holiday story that kids love to participate in.

Ideas for use:

– use board maker pictures of all of the visitors she meets on her walk (e.g. Shoes, pants, shirt, etc.) They can add their part when it happens. The story is repetitive so there is lots of opportunity for participation.

– use visuals (like above) for Retelling the story. Incorporate temporal markers (first, then, after that, etc.)

-a good story for the story grammar marker and Braidy (www.mindwingconcepts.com). A pretty straightforward sequence and clear kickoff.

-act out each visitor. For example the shoes go clomp clomp… have kiddos stomp their feet each time. The pants go wiggle wiggle…have kiddos wiggle their bodies, etc.

-a great story to act out in a group. Different children can be each of the parts, or use objects as the parts (shoes, pants, etc.)

-for articulation, because it’s so repetitive you can get lots of practice for some specific targets. /sh/ with shake, shake and “she” and /l/ blends…clomp, clomp, clap, clap, for /s/ blends I change afraid to “scared” “I’m not scared of you”

Submitted by: Meghan G.Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Piggies

Piggies in the Pumpkin Patch

Book: Piggies in the Pumpkin Patch

Author: Mary Peterson and Jennifer Rofe

Age:  preschool, early elementary

Description:  Two young piggies explore their world by sneaking around the pumpkin patch while their mama sleeps.  Their adventures bring them under, through, over, across, between… (you get the picture), objects around the farm until they land safely in the pumpkin patch.

Goals/Concepts:  

  • Sequencing
  • Motor planning
  • Sensory modulation
  • Motor exploration
  • Body awareness
  • Understanding positional words and concepts

Why I like this book:  Adorable illustrations make this simple story appealing for adults as well as children…AND it’s a fun book to act out.

Ideas for use:

  • Read the book through once and see how many piggy adventures the kids can remember.
  • Ask kids to retell the story using temporal markers such as first, then, next, etc.
  • Have kids use objects around the house, in the yard, on a playground or in a gym to set up an obstacle course that represents the actions of the piggies.
  • A nice map in the front of the book can be used to help the kids re-tell the story and help them set up the course.
  • Emphasize positional words such as under, over, between as kids move through their pumpkin patch obstacle course.
  • Use deep breathing exercises to lower arousal levels as the “piggies” fall asleep in the pumpkin patch at the end of the story.

Submitted by: Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

Please support books4all and order this book from Amazon.com.  Thank you!

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