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Rosies Walk Cover

Rosie’s Walk

Title: Rosie’s Walk

Author: Pat Hutchins

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: Rosie the hen goes for a walk around the farm. Little does she know that there is a fox following her.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Early narrative
  • Simple sequencing
  • Farm vocabulary
  • Basic concepts/prepositions (around, over, under, etc.)
  • Early perspective taking
  • Early prediction (Will the fox get Rosie? What do you think will happen?)

Why I like this book: The story is simple, and kids love it. Great pictures, and simple humorous ending.

Ideas for use:

  • Great introducing of “setting” (the farm) from the Story Grammar Marker. Discuss other settings, and describe them (what do we see here, hear, feel, etc.)
  • Use “Braidy” (www.mindwingconcepts.com) for a simple sequence story to have kids retell.
  • Use the pictures in the story, and have kids be “the teacher.” Encourage temporal markers: first, next, then, last.
  • Practice prepositions. Have kids “act” out what Rosie does. Have a toy hen (or have them be Rosie!) and have them walk around, through, under, over. Use props.
  • Act out the story. Have a dyad…one child is Rosie, and one can be the fox. Help them make a plan and act it out. If 3 children, have one be the “narrator.”
  • Discuss why Rosie doesn’t know that the fox is behind her. How do we know? Point out body language, where her eyes are, how the fox is likely moving and sounding, etc. Why doesn’t he want her to know…

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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mr bounce

Mr. Bounce

Title:   Mr. Bounce (Mr. Men and Little Miss)

Author:  Roger Hargreaves

Age:  preschool, elementary school

Description:  One of the “Mr. Books” that outright speaks to those overly active, well-meaning, but tough-to-manage kids.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Self-regulation
  • Body awareness
  • Motor planning
  • Perspective taking
  • Good intentions
  • Understanding consequences of actions
  • Accepting help from an adult

Why I like this book:  First of all, this is a series that I used when I was teaching in the late 70’s, and it is adorable.   Even though it’s “old”, kids respond to the characters and story.  There are few books that specifically address those bouncy kids and, as an OT, I am happy to use this one.

Ideas for use:  

  • Before reading, discuss times when you moved too quickly or moved without looking which caused a problem for you or others.  For example, knocking over a coffee cup or tripping over a pair of shoes.  Have the kids offer suggestions of times their high activity level caused bad things to happen.  This helps “normalize” the situation without pointing a negative finger at the “Bouncers.”
  • As you read the story, have the kids anticipate what will happen.  There are lots of opportunities for visualization.  For example, “… you can guess what happened next, can’t you?” and “As you can imagine, that made things very difficult.”  Taking time to think about and discuss these concepts helps kids with ideation and planning.
  • Discuss feelings as you read.  How did Mr. Bounce feel about falling in the water?  The simple line drawings actually have very expressive faces.  Have the kids work on mimicking the expressions.
  • Young kids may not know they need help from adults to manage their high activity level.  They may be disciplined for accidents they cause and feel that they need to figure it out on their own.  I love that Mr. Bounce seeks help from an adult in this book.  Talk with kids about how we, as adults, are here to help them, not punish them.
  • Play a variation of the Silly-Calm body game from the Social Adventures App after reading this book to help kids recognize they can have control over their bodies.  When you say, “Bounce” kids can move, dance, or bounce around the room.  When you say, “Red Boots” (the shoes that were given to Mr. Bounce to help him be more grounded) the kids will freeze their bodies or pretend to sleep, or go back to their seats and remain still.

Check out their great website for lots of fun stuff http://www.mrmen.com

Submitted by:  Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L

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woolly

Can I Bring Woolly to the Library, Ms. Reeder?

Title:  Can I Bring Woolly to the Library, Ms. Reeder?

Author: Lois Grambling

Description: A little boy fantasizes about bringing a Woolly Mammoth named “Woolly” to the library. He provides many reasons why Wooly should be allowed, and predicts what would and could happen.

 

Goals:

  • “Why” questions
  • Inferencing/prediction
  • Curriculum connections: extinct animals
  • Reading Body Language

Why I like this book: The illustrations are wonderful for kids and grownups alike. An entertaining story that can address many higher level language goals.

Ideas for this book:

  • The boy provides many predictions as to what might happen if Wooly comes to the library. Have students generate their own ideas. What could happen if a big animal comes to the library? How could he help? What problems might there be?
  • Lots of opportunity for both implicit and explicit “why” questions. For example,  Why does Woolly need slippers? (because he would make too much noise walking around the library; Why would Wooly be helpful at putting books away? (because he can reach the tall shelves), etc.
  • A great story to connect with expository text/media  around extinct animals. Here is a great example from Brainpop Jr
  • The illustrations are vivid and clear. Great examples of body language for children to interpret. How are characters feeling? Why? How can you tell? To assist with understanding pair with thinking and speaking bubbles
  • The story ends with the boy realizing that Wooly may be homesick if he came to live with the boy. Have students discuss/write about a time when they were homesick? How did they feel and why?
  • At the very end the boy suggests bringing another extinct animal (Saber Tooth Tiger) to the library. Have students create their own version of this story. Use a story generation app/software like the Story Patch App. Have then predict what could happen if that animal were to come to the library? Or to School?

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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The Pigeon Wants a Puppy!

Title: The Pigeon Wants a Puppy

Author: Mo Willems

Description: The silly pigeon thinks he wants a puppy, until he meets one.

Goals:

  • Perspective Taking
  • Reading Body Language
  • Tone of Voice
  • Prediction

Why I like this book: The pigeon always entertains children, and allows us to address some goals along the way.

Ideas for this book:

  • A great story for kids to “act” as the person the Pigeon is talking to. Have them converse with the pigeon. Given the Pigeon’s responses, what do they think the conversation partner said?
  • A great post by Sean Sweeney at Speechtechie.com about a “fake texting” activity where you could do just this.
  • The pigeon is very expressive, have children interpret body language and act out. You could even take pictures of these emotions and body language and  have kids create their own “body language” story with various emotions. Try apps like Story Patch to create this story.
  • If working on Tone of Voice, have kids speak with the Pigeon’s emotions. Use a recording device to give students feedback. Is that how they wanted to sound? Does it match the Pigeon’s body language? We love the easi-speak microphone for recording and so do kids!
  • Have student brainstorm what responsibilities you would have taking care of a puppy? Can they generate a list of other pets? What are the responsibilities? What are reasons why parents may not want you to have a pet? Can they take another perspective?
  • The pigeon decides that he’d rather have a walrus. Have kids generate what a walrus might need? What could be “scary” to the pigeon about a walrus? Would a walrus be a good pet?
  • Students could write the “next” book as the pigeon attempts to explain why he wants a walrus.

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Picture 3

City Dog Country Frog

Title: City Dog, Country Frog

Author:  Mo Willems

Description: A story of friendship between a dog and a frog.

Goals/objectives:

  • friendship
  • social skills
  • vocabulary (seasons)
  • descriptive language
  • prediction
  • past tense verbs

Why I like this book: Beautiful pictures and message about friendship.

Ideas for use:

    • great for discussion about friendship in general. What made their friendship work? They do each others interests (not just their own), they took care of each other, they check in with each other, they make plans, etc.
    • Good for discussion about “change” as the frog doesn’t return at a point in the story, and the dog must adjust. You can predict/infer what could have happened to the frog as the author doesn’t explicitly state (i.e. Did the frog hibernate? Move to a new location? Did he die?)
    • could use for descriptive language (oral or written) and tie to the Linda Mood Bell Visualizing and Verbalizing program. What does the dog see, hear, feel, smell, how does he move, etc.
    • discuss the seasons. Brainstorm ideas for activities and events within each season
    • Can tie to science curriculum if appropriate (frog life cycle, hibernation, seasonal changes, etc.)
    • great modeling of present vs. past tense throughout the story
    • have students write the “next” chapter of this story. What happens with dog’s new friendship? What do they do next? Have them write and illustrate….

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Tuesday

Tuesday

Book: Tuesday

Author: David Wiesner

Age: Elementary

Description: When the sun goes down on Tuesday, frogs are given the power to fly on their lily pads. They travel all over the town, in this book which is all but wordless.

Goals/Concepts:

  • reading body language
  • narrative language/ retelling
  • inferencing/ prediction
  • perspective taking

Why I love this book: The illustrations are amazing, and a fun story that kids love to retell. Lots of opportunity for language.

Ideas for Use:

  • Create thinking and speaking bubbles and have kiddos fill in what animals and characters are thinking. Discuss “why.” Focus on body language.
  • A great book for prediction. Where will the frogs fly next? Have them guess before moving to the next page.
  • Ask kids where they would fly if they could? Why? Great for the why/because sentence structure for oral or written language (e.g. I would fly through a zoo because I would want to get close to exotic animals.)
  • Have them create the next Tuesday. Where do the pigs fly?
  • A great story to have kids “retell” and use their own words. Encourage temporal markers, first, then, next, last
  • A great story for inferencing and higher level “why” questions. For example, “Why is there a police man looking at lily pads?” or  “Why isn’t the woman reacting to the frogs (“because she’s asleep, etc.).”

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Freckle Juice

Freckle Juice

Title: Freckle Juice

Author: Judy Blume
Age: Elementary School
Description: A short chapter book in which Andrew Marcus really wants freckles and can and does do almost anything to try and get them.
Goals/Concepts:
  • Main idea
  • Perspective taking
  • Reading comprehension
  • Prediction
  • “trickery”

Why I like this book: The chapters are short and broken up with pictures which makes it more enjoyable and manageable for struggling readers, or those with shorter attention spans. The story is humorous and loved by all kids.

Ideas for use:

  • Working on summarizing of each chapter. Have children write/share in 2-3 sentences the “most important thing” that happened.
  • Great for perspective taking as there is a huge element of trickery. If children are challenged by the concept of trickery, use drawings (stick figures will work!) and thinking and speaking bubbles to help them visualize and understand throughout each chapter. Write what characters are “thinking” vs. “saying” and why
  • Have children make predictions at the end of every chapter
  • Work in implicit and explict comprehension questions after each chapter
  • Have kids make up their own version of “freckle juice,” what would they include in their recipe. Who could they “trick”? (always discussing not to do this for real!)

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Pirates Don't pic

Pirates Don’t Change Diapers

Book: Pirates Don’t Change Diapers

Author: Melinda Long

Age: Early Elementary

Description: While Jeremy’s mom is running an errand, his old pirate friends come for a visit and are forced to help Jeremy take care of his baby sister.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Narrative Language and Retelling
  • Reading Body Language
  • Figurative Language
  • Prediction

Why I like this book: The illustrations are amazing. Kids love the humorous story. Who doesn’t love silly pirates?

Ideas for use:

  • Great narrative structure for the discussing and teaching the Story Grammar Marker elements(clear characters, setting, initiating event, events, resolution, etc.)
  • Use with “Braidy” (www.mindwingconcepts.com) to help students retell the story. A good example of multiple “kickoffs” (1)pirates show up, 2)can’t find the map) See the Mindwings concepts website for more information on this amazing narrative tool.
  • Examples of multiple meaning words/figurative language (rock, babysitter). See if kids can come up with other similar words (i.e. duck, carpool, etc.) Have them draw “both” meanings.
  • Discuss the amazing body language in this story (i.e. boy holding stinking diaper). Draw thinking bubbles- what are they thinking? Why? How can you tell?
  • Have kids act out the body language and the story. Could use a pretend play boat and people, or have the kids act themselves.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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llama

Is Your Mama a Llama?

Title: Is Your Mama a Llama?

Author: Deborah Guarino

Age: preschool, early elementary

Description: A young llama asks many of his animal friends if their mothers are llamas.

Goals/Concepts:
• /l/ words (llama, Lloyd, Lynn, seal, etc.)
• Phonological awareness (rhyming)
• Early narrative
• Early prediction
• Animal vocabulary

Why I like this book: The repetitive nature allows for kiddos to help you read, rhyme, and make “guesses” as to who the baby animal’s mother is. The illustrations are awesome too.

Ideas for use:
• Have your /l/ articulation kiddo “read” the book asking each character, “Is your mama a LLAMA?” (sentence level articulation practice)
• Have your students fill in the rhyming word as you’re reading. If they’re struggling with the word, give them the initial sound. (i.e. You don’t need to go on, I think your mama sounds more like a sssww…..(they fill in swan if possible).
• Retell. Have the children recall the different animals that Lloyd runs into. Encourage temporal markers such as “first, next, then, last…”
• Review the animals in the story. Discuss the similarities and differences among the animals (i.e. swan vs. seal, bat vs. kangaroo, etc.)

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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the-paper-bag-princess

Paperbag Princess

Title: The Paper Bag Princess

Author: Robert Munsch

Age: Early Elementary

Description: This Story follows a princess whose life gets interrupted by a dragon.

Goals/Concepts:

• Narrative language-retelling

• Perspective taking

• Inferencing/Prediction

• Reading body language

Why I like this book: The ending is priceless. Every little girl and boy should read this book. Children love the illustrations and the way the princess tricks the dragon.

Ideas for use:
• Retelling- Follows the Story Grammar Marker framework well through Mindwingconcepts A clear “kick-off,” sequence of events, and resolution

•Try this from the princess’s point of view vs. the dragon’s, even the prince! Use “thinking bubbles” or even “Braidy” from the SGM listed above.

• There is lots of “trickery” in this story. Help students make guesses as to “why” the princess is acting like she is (i.e. Why is she complimenting the dragon who just burned down her castle and kidnapped the prince?) Have them think of ways that they have “tricked” others.

•The illustrations are amazing, and are great for pointing out various emotions (many of the “universal emotions”- happy, sad, mad, scared, surprised, disgusted). Have students imitate the pictures. Talk about how ALL of their body can show emotions, not just their face.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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