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Little Old Lady Who Wasn't afraid of anything

The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

Title: The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

Author: Linda Williams

Description: A walk in the woods turns into an unexpected surprise for the Little old lady. She meets some visitors along the way who follow her home to try to scare her.

Goals/concepts:

-sequencing

-narrative /Retelling

-Halloween vocabulary (jack’o lantern, scarecrow)

-clothing vocabulary (shirt, pants, shoes, gloves, hat)

-articulation (l blends, sh, s blends )

Why I like this book: It’s a fun holiday story that kids love to participate in.

Ideas for use:

– use board maker pictures of all of the visitors she meets on her walk (e.g. Shoes, pants, shirt, etc.) They can add their part when it happens. The story is repetitive so there is lots of opportunity for participation.

– use visuals (like above) for Retelling the story. Incorporate temporal markers (first, then, after that, etc.)

-a good story for the story grammar marker and Braidy (www.mindwingconcepts.com). A pretty straightforward sequence and clear kickoff.

-act out each visitor. For example the shoes go clomp clomp… have kiddos stomp their feet each time. The pants go wiggle wiggle…have kiddos wiggle their bodies, etc.

-a great story to act out in a group. Different children can be each of the parts, or use objects as the parts (shoes, pants, etc.)

-for articulation, because it’s so repetitive you can get lots of practice for some specific targets. /sh/ with shake, shake and “she” and /l/ blends…clomp, clomp, clap, clap, for /s/ blends I change afraid to “scared” “I’m not scared of you”

Submitted by: Meghan G.Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Tuesday

Tuesday

Book: Tuesday

Author: David Wiesner

Age: Elementary

Description: When the sun goes down on Tuesday, frogs are given the power to fly on their lily pads. They travel all over the town, in this book which is all but wordless.

Goals/Concepts:

  • reading body language
  • narrative language/ retelling
  • inferencing/ prediction
  • perspective taking

Why I love this book: The illustrations are amazing, and a fun story that kids love to retell. Lots of opportunity for language.

Ideas for Use:

  • Create thinking and speaking bubbles and have kiddos fill in what animals and characters are thinking. Discuss “why.” Focus on body language.
  • A great book for prediction. Where will the frogs fly next? Have them guess before moving to the next page.
  • Ask kids where they would fly if they could? Why? Great for the why/because sentence structure for oral or written language (e.g. I would fly through a zoo because I would want to get close to exotic animals.)
  • Have them create the next Tuesday. Where do the pigs fly?
  • A great story to have kids “retell” and use their own words. Encourage temporal markers, first, then, next, last
  • A great story for inferencing and higher level “why” questions. For example, “Why is there a police man looking at lily pads?” or  “Why isn’t the woman reacting to the frogs (“because she’s asleep, etc.).”

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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swallowshellbook

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Shell

Title: There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Shell!

Author: Lucille Colondro

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: This story follows the same sequence as the little old lady who swallowed a fly. However, this is a beach theme, with the little old lady swallowing sand, water,  sea gulls and more.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Sequencing
  • Early Narrative Skills
  • Beach Vocabulary
  • Why questions
  • Phonological Awareness (rhyming)

Why I like this book: The absurdity of the story itself, always hooks kids.  Especially the “burping” and “throwing up” concept that happens in the story.  A great summer read, as many kids spend lots of time at the beach.

Ideas for use:

  • Photo copy the pages, and have children put the story in order after reading it.
  • Use cut out pictures from magazine, or Boardmaker software pictures of the various parts (shell, crab, seagull, etc.), and have them place in order as it happens in the story to keep them engaged
  • Highlight “why” questions when reading this story. Why did she swallow the crab? (so it will live in the shell!)
  • Have children attempt to fill in the blank of the rhyming word when reading (i.e. I don’t know why she swallowed the shell…she didn’t____ (tell)). See if they can generate other words that rhyme with the target.
  • A great story to discuss beach vocabulary, or water animals (crabs, lobsters, sharks, etc.). See if kids can generate what they would bring to the beach and what they would see. Use big paper and have them draw and generate a beach scene.
  • Do a simple beach craft with simple sequencing (i.e. make a crab or shell out of a paper plate, make a starfish and cover with ‘real” sand, etc.). Focus on the sequence and include temporal markers (first, next, then, etc.). You can even take digital pics of the child doing each of the steps. Print and send home- a great sequential and personal narrative task.
  • Create their own “There Was an Old Lady book…. Have them think of a “final” product like the sand castle (i.e. a birthday cake, a tree house, etc.) and what “parts” she would have to swallow (i.e. the flour, frosting, candles, etc.). Kids love to think of ways to have her “throw up” like in this story.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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Waking up images

Waking Up is Hard to Do

Title:   Waking Up Is Hard to Do

Author:   Music and Lyrics by Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, Children’s Lyrics by Neil Sedaka, Illustrated by Daniel Miyares
Age:   Preschool, Early Elementary
Description:   A young alligator goes through his morning routine getting up and ready for school.  His engine is running low at first light but slowly improves as he participates in all the sensory and motor activities involved in a typical morning.  A CD is included that adds to the delightful lyrics and illustrations.
Goals/Concepts:
  • Sequencing
  • Routines
  • Activities of daily living
  • Arousal levels from low to high
  • Sensory input inherent in all morning activities (vision-morning light, auditory-alarm clock, movement-stretching, oral/tactile-brushing teeth, oral-breakfast, muscle sense-books and back pack)
  • Family
  • Social/friendship
  • Early narrative
  • Early prediction
  • Animal Vocabulary (jungle, zoo animals)

Why I like this book:  Catchy tune, fun lyrics, and bright, beautiful illustrations make this book hard to put down… even for an adult.  There is so much to see on each page.

Ideas for use:

  • Many families describe mornings as very challenging.  Try reading this book to them in the evening in preparation for the following day.
  • Play the CD first thing in the morning and look at illustrations together to start the day.
  • Use the book and story to illustrate some activities that can help increase a low arousal state…to get the body engine running.
  • While looking at the book, have kids identify parts of each step in the routine that might help them get their own engines going in the morning.
  • Act out the story NOT in the morning to emphasize the steps and sequence of the routine.
  • Use the pictures to have the child retell the story. Encourage words like “first, next, after that, last, etc.”
  • A great book for description as the illustrations are gorgeous. Play “I spy” on each page
  • Lots of opportunity for “why” and prediction (i.e. why is he feeling blue? Why is the turtle missing the bus? After brushing teeth, what will he do next?, etc.)

Submitted by:  Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L and Meghan Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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