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LittleMouse1

The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear

Title: The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear

Author: Dan and Audrey Woods

Description: A little mouse is thrilled that he finds a delicious strawberry, however, he hears that there is a big hungry bear who loves strawberries. Especially one that has just been picked….

Goals:

  • Reading Body Language/Facial expressions
  • Narrative/Story Retell
  • Early Prediction
  • Speech production (s blends)
  • Pretend Play

Why I like this book: A classic that is loved by all children, especially the surprise ending 😉

Ideas for this book:

  • The mouse is very expressive. A great story if working on emotions, and reading body language. Have children act out the mouse’s expressions and body language and/or guess yours. There is an emphasis on scared/worried as well as happy and relieved. Add “thinking bubbles” above the mouse and have children think about what he is thinking/feeling.
  •  A great story for early story grammar elements as it’s a simple sequence. There are simple characters, setting, problem (kickoff), internal response,events and resolution. Great when introducing the Story Grammar Marker through Mindwingconcepts
  • As the mouse is trying to keep the strawberry from the bear, have children predict what he might do next? Will he hide under the rug? Under the bed? Turn it into pie? See if kids can think of new and different ways the mouse can hide or use the strawberry.
  • A great story to “act out” given its simple nature. I’ve used it in individual sessions and dyads (both as mice). What can they find to “be” the strawberry? What will be the house? The hammock at the end? If you don’t have a lot of space to act it out physically, use a little mouse and a strawberry for more traditional “pretend play.”
  • Lots of opportunity for /s/ blends (strawberry, sniff, smell, etc.) Readers can read the story, non-readers can repeat.
  • Add a craft for the story. One of the fantastic OTs that I work with created a strawberry out of red construction paper, and glued little lentils as the “seeds.”

Submitted by; Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

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do you

Do You Want To Be My Friend?

Title: Do You Want To Be My Friend?

Author:  Eric Carle

Description: A lonely mouse is looking for a friend to play with. He has to ask a lot of animals before he finds the right one.

Goals/objectives:

  • Early Inferencing/Predicting
  • Possession
  • /s/ production (final word position)
  • Animal Vocabulary
  • Why Questions and Reasoning
  • Sequencing
  • Early Narrative/ Retelling
  • Friendship or Social Skills

Why I like this book: It’s a simple, mainly wordless book that kids love and can be adapted for a number of speech, language or social goals across ages.

Ideas for use:

  • Have children predict what animal is coming next. The tail of each animal is shown before the actual animal. Have them make guesses.
  • Great for possession. The Elephant‘s tail, the Seal’s tail, etc. Good for part/whole relationships as well.
  • Great for /s/ targets. Can adapt to word, sentence levels. Mouse, mice, all final position possession (snake’s, peacock’s, etc.)
  • Why questions and reasoning. WHY isn’t the horse a good fit for the mouse? (grumpy or too big) WHY isn’t the elephant a good fit for the mouse? (too big, would be hard to play with, etc.). WHY isn’t the snake a good fit? (he would eat the mouse!) Because it’s wordless, have kids predict what the animal is likely say to the mouse. Can add in tone of voice discussion as well.
  • Print pictures of the animals, or use toy animals and have children sequence the story. Add in temporal markers such as first, next, then, etc.
  • Have children “act” out the story. If in a group, many animals to re-enact. If not in a group, provide a toy mouse or have the child be the toy mouse and ask other “animals” to play in the accurate order.
  • For a social group- good for discussion around joining others play. It doesn’t always work out. Good to discuss this concept and what makes a good friend. The mouse doesn’t give up, and eventually finds a “good match” for a friend.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

Please support books4all and order this book from Amazon.com.  Thank you!

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the busy spider

The Very Busy Spider

Title: The Very Busy Spider

Author: Eric Carle

Age: Preschool, Early Elementary

Description: This story follows a busy spider that is working on her web on a fence post on a farm. Various farm animals stop by to see her, but she is too busy to answer.

Goals/Concepts:

  • Question Formulation (Do you want to X?)
  • Why? (Because she is too busy)- repetitive practice
  • Farm Animal Vocabulary
  • Speech production:/sp/ blends, /s/ (medial, final position)
  • Prediction (Who will be next to ask the spider?)
  • Social Language: Is it expected that the spider isn’t answering others? Should we ignore our friends if we’re busy?

Why I like this book? Kids love the textured pages, as the spider builds the web.

Ideas for use:

•Make a spider web out of string or yarn, have articulation words/pics get “stuck” (tape, glue stick) in the web for home practice

•Role play what she could say to her friends instead of ignoring them.

Submitted by: Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP

Please support books4all and order this book from Amazon.com

*Like this review and activities? Check out the Social Adventures App for more activities for children.